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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

1 edition of Saxon land charters of Wiltshire found in the catalog.

Saxon land charters of Wiltshire

Grundy, G. B.

Saxon land charters of Wiltshire

Series 1 and 2.

by Grundy, G. B.

  • 373 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Royal Archaeological Institute in London .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14622806M

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion. Librivox Free Audiobook. Full text of "Notes on Wiltshire names" See other formats. A Charter refers to a grant of authority or rights. Anglo-Saxon Charters typically granted land or recorded a specific privilege, the oldest of which granted land to the Church. Malmesbury may have received such a Charter as early as under King Alfred’s reign (), but the generally accepte.

In the West Saxon king, Ine, dated a charter from ‘the place which is called Eburleagh’. The charter may not be genuine, and Everleigh may be misidentified, but at face value this evidence suggests that ‘the wood or clearing of the wild boar’, which is the meaning of the name, was of interest to royalty quite early in the Saxon period. The early history of the religious community at Glastonbury has been the subject of much speculation and imaginative writing, but there are few sources which genuinely further our knowledge of Glastonbury Abbey in the Anglo-Saxon period. This has resulted in a lack of serious historical research and hence the neglect of an important ecclesiastical s: 2.

Grundy, , 'The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire (first series)' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 76 p. Downman, E.A. and Goddard, E.H., 'Plans of Wiltshire Earthworks' Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine Vol. 40 p. online copy. In , another charter reported that King Edgar had granted land at Edyndon to Romsey Abbey. The Domesday book has an entry for Romsey Abbey holding land at Edendone (Wilt'schire) at the time of Edward the Confessor and also in , and this is known to be at Edington, Wiltshire.


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Saxon land charters of Wiltshire by Grundy, G. B. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire. Archaeological Journal: Vol. 76, No. 1, pp. Cited by: 4. The Boundaries of two Anglo-Saxon Charters relationg to land at Corscombe.

Barnard, J Published by Academic Journal Offprint from - Dorset Natural History &. ‘Ley’ or ‘leigh’ names are among the most widespread and intensively studied of English place-names. They are a common feature within Anglo-Saxon charter bounds of the 8th to 11th centuries.

The corpus of charters constitutes a unique subset of leah. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "Anglo-saxon Charters".

Saxon boundaries The Saxons indicated their boundaries by describing obvious landmarks in Land Charters and much of the work on those Charters was carried out by Dr G.B. Grundy. In an article in the Archaeological Journal. Vol. LXXVI of he identified two surveys, the first dated AD The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire (First Series) (pp ) G.

Grundy, M.A., : PDF: 14 Mb Obituary: Sir William St. John Hope, Litt.D., D.C.L. (pp ) PDF: Kb Notices of Archaeological Publications (pp ) PDF: Kb Proceedings at Meetings (pp ) PDF: 2 Mb.

'The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire', Archaeological Journal 2nd series 27 (), 8– See cited charters Grundy, Worcs., I: Grundy, G. B., 'Saxon Charters of Worcestershire', Birmingham Archaeological Society Transactions and Proceedings 52 (), 1– This is probably the best book about Anglo-Saxon charters I have read this week.

The charter "Lease of land by Oswald Archbishop of York and Bishop of Worcester to Eadric" made me burst into s: 1. Domesday Book Volume 10 The Saxon land charters of Hampshire with notes on place and field names', The Saxon land charters of Wiltshire', ().

The Sherborne "Chartulary"', Fritz Sax 1A Volume of Memorial Essays from his Friends (). The South-Western element in the Old English Chronicle'. Anglo-Saxon charters on single sheets: a classified list Brief descriptions The Language of Landscape (LangScape) (King's College, London) Searchable database of Anglo-Saxon estate boundaries, compiled from charters.

Anglo-Saxon Charters (ASChart) (King's College, London) Texts of Anglo-Saxon charters from before the yearmarked up using XML. See also G. Grundy, ‘The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire’, Arch. J., LXXVI,A further hint of continuity is provided by the Roman bricks used in the construction of Britford Church, a structure in which work possibly of the 8th century A.D.

is still preserved. See Victoria County History, Wiltshire, 11,On a side-note, Grundy also traced the line of a very early Saxon military road using very early land charters. This led from Kilmington (close to Longleat), via Cley Hill, Beckington, Bradford on Avon, Monkton Farleigh, Kingsdown, Corsham, Biddlestone, and possibly also to Malmesbury.

Amongst the archives at Winchester College are 4 Anglo-Saxon charters which conveyed lands to the monastery in Winchester known as New Minster. These charters are the only pre-conquest documents from the New Minster (later known as Hyde Abbey) to survive.

The monastery was founded on the initiative of the West-Saxon royal family. The Saxons used beorh for prehistoric barrows and hlæw for their own barrows, but pleased themselves which term to use for prehistoric barrows containing intrusive Saxon burials (e.g.

Rough Barrow, Cheselbourne 8b, Dorset; Cwicelmes Low, Ardley, Oxon.; the better known Cwichelmes Low (East Hendred, Oxon. ex Berkshire) is mentioned not in a charier but in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

'The Saxon Land Charters of Wiltshire', Archaeological Journal 2nd series 27 (), 8– See cited charters Gurney Gurney, F. G., 'Yttingaford and the Tenth-Century Bounds of Chalgrave and Linslade', Bedfordshire Historical Records Society 5 (), – The earliest known reference to the village occurs in a Saxon land charter of King Cyncwulf of wessex,AD, but it was in existence centuries before as not only is it situated on the ancient track way between Exeter and Dover but the Roman road from Old Sarum to Uphill in the Mendips (where lead was mined) also passed through the village, while the existence of Iron age fortifications on the.

The Saxon Origins of Ansty The fact that the manor of Ansty in the Hundred1of Dunworth is mentioned twice in the Domesday Book enables us to learn that there were three Saxon lords who held parts of the manor before the Norman Conquest in They were.

Seminar II: Charters, Cartularies and Other Administrative Records. Charters are one of the few archival sources to survive in significant quantities for the entire medieval period.

They are usually short, self-contained texts, concerned with the ownership of land or of some other right or privilege. "Berhtwulf comes" was granted land in Dorset by King Alfred under a charter dated []. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names "Beorhtwulf ealdorman in Essex" among those who died "during those three years" [].

BEORHTNOTH [Byrhtnoth] (-killed in battle Maldon, Essex 10 Augbur Ely St Eormenhild). Ealdorman of Essex The Saxon Land Charters of Hampshire with notes on place and field-names (pp ) G. Grundy, M.A., PDF: 10 Mb Cocking and its Church (pp ) Philip Mainwaring Johnston, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A.

PDF: 3 Mb Ancient Burial-Places: A Suggestion (pp ) Tony Cyriax: PDF: Kb. Unusually, the charter is in the form of a book. Charters have provided fundamental source material for understanding Anglo-Saxon England that complements the Anglo-Saxon Chronicleand other literary sources.

They are often used by historians as sources for the history of Anglo-Saxon England. It was frequently kings who gave land in charters.Genre/Form: History Sources Charters: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Earle, John, Hand-book to the land-charters, and other Saxonic documents.He endowed the Abbey library and gave common land, the King's Heath, to the freemen inalthough the charter has been lost.

In the Domesday Book () the town is placed at the head of the Wiltshire entry and has the most detailed description of any Wiltshire community.